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Embedded Payments

Embedded payments refers to the integration of payment functionality directly into a website or application, allowing customers to make purchases without being redirected to an external payment page. This can be done using APIs or pre-built libraries provided by payment processors. The goal of embedded payments is to make the purchasing process smoother and more seamless for customers.

How safe are embedded payments from a regulatory point of view?

Embedded payments, like any other payment method, are subject to various regulatory compliance requirements to ensure the safety and security of transactions. These regulations can vary depending on the country or region, but some common ones include:

  • PCI-DSS (Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards): This set of standards is designed to protect against credit card fraud and data breaches. Payment processors and merchants that handle credit card transactions must comply with these standards to ensure that sensitive information is properly protected.
  • KYC (Know Your Customer) and AML (Anti-Money Laundering) regulations: These regulations are designed to prevent financial crime such as money laundering and terrorist financing. Payment processors and merchants may be required to collect and verify certain information about their customers to comply with these regulations.
  • GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) and other data protection laws: These regulations are designed to protect personal data of customers. Payment processors and merchants must comply with these regulations by ensuring that any data collected is processed fairly and transparently, and that appropriate security measures are in place to protect that data.

It is important to note that compliance with these regulations is the responsibility of the payment processors and merchants, not the customers. Payment processors and merchants are typically required to go through a certification or registration process to demonstrate compliance.

Generally, how safe are embedded payments?

Embedded payments, like any other payment method, can be safe if proper security measures are in place and followed. These measures include:

  • Secure data transmission: Sensitive information, such as credit card numbers, should be transmitted over a secure connection (HTTPS) to prevent eavesdropping or tampering.
  • Data encryption: Sensitive information should be encrypted both in transit and at rest to protect against data breaches.
  • Tokenization: Instead of storing sensitive information, tokenization replaces the sensitive data with a unique token that can be used for future transactions.
  • Secure storage: Payment processors and merchants should implement proper security measures to protect stored data and prevent unauthorized access.
  • Compliance with industry standards: Payment processors and merchants should comply with industry standards such as PCI-DSS, KYC/AML, and GDPR.
  • Regular security audits and testing: Regularly testing and auditing the security controls can identify and address vulnerabilities in a timely manner.

It is important to note that the security of embedded payments also depends on the payment processor or merchant you are using. You should research and choose a reputable provider that follows industry standards and has a track record of secure transactions.

By using embedded payments are you skirting regulation or the law?

No, using embedded payments does not mean that a business is skirting regulation or the law. In fact, embedded payments are subject to the same regulations and laws as other payment methods. For example, businesses that use embedded payments are still subject to PCI-DSS, KYC/AML, and GDPR regulations, and must comply with these regulations in order to protect sensitive information and prevent financial crime.

It is the responsibility of the payment processors and merchants to ensure compliance with these regulations, and they are typically required to go through a certification or registration process to demonstrate compliance. If a business uses a payment processor or merchant that does not comply with these regulations, they may be putting their customers’ sensitive information at risk, and also may be in violation of the law.

It is important for businesses to do their due diligence and choose a reputable provider that follows industry standards and has a track record of secure transactions.

Some examples of embedded payments?

Examples of embedded payments include:

  1. In-app payments: This type of embedded payments allows customers to make purchases directly within a mobile application, without having to leave the app to complete the transaction. This can be done using APIs or pre-built libraries provided by payment processors.
  2. Online checkout: This type of embedded payments allows customers to make purchases directly on a website without being redirected to an external payment page. This can be done using APIs or pre-built libraries provided by payment processors, and allows customers to complete the transaction in one seamless process.
  3. Point-of-sale (POS) systems: This type of embedded payments allows customers to make purchases directly at a physical store using a card reader or other payment terminal. This can be done using APIs or pre-built libraries provided by payment processors, and can often be integrated with existing POS systems.
  4. Chatbot payments: This type of embedded payments allows customers to make purchases through chatbot interfaces, such as those provided by messaging apps. This can be done using APIs or pre-built libraries provided by payment processors and enables customers to complete the transaction through conversation with the chatbot.
  5. Virtual Reality payments: This type of embedded payments allows customers to make purchases through virtual reality interfaces such as VR headset and controllers. This can be done using APIs or pre-built libraries provided by payment processors and enables customers to complete the transaction through interaction within the virtual environment.

It is important to note that the specific implementation of embedded payments can vary depending on the payment processor or merchant you are using.

This page was last updated on January 16, 2023.